http://worldmeets.us/images/Space-Station-Karen-Nyberg-hair_pic.png

Astronaut Karen Nyberg on the International Space Station in

2008. We may not hear of them, but things go wrong on the

ISS and space in general on a regular basis.

 

 

Slip-Ups in Outer Space: More Common than You Might Think (Financial Times Deutschland, Germany)

 

"In the early hours of Wednesday, the European ATV 3 supply capsule was supposed to undock from the International Space Station loaded with waste and full urine tanks. NASA broadcast the undocking procedure live over the Internet - but nothing happened. ... There were immediate recriminations on expert blogs. ... This mishap of a command sent to the wrong capsule address is just the latest chapter in a book full of misadventures in space."

 

By Gerhard Hegmann

 

Translated By Nathalie Klepper

 

September 28, 2012

 

Germany - Financial Times Deutschland - Original Article (German)

This is the 30-foot-high European ATV 3, designed to carry up to 70 tons of cargo to the International Space Station, and haul out waste and garbage. A recent glitch involving the craft has created some controversy over who or what is to blame.

 

ITV VIDEO NEWS, U.K.: Formal handover of power at the International Space Station, Sept. 16, 00:00:42RealVideo

The transport of oxygen, water, food and other payload to the International Space Station has been a routine operation for years. Until recently, this has been done mainly with unmanned Russian Progress capsules. They carry up valuable payloads, depart with waste and are sent back into the earth's atmosphere. There, everything burns up as if in an incineration plant. In the early hours of Wednesday, that was the plan for the European ATV 3 [Automated Transfer Vehicle] supply capsule, which was supposed to undock from the ISS loaded with waste and full urine tanks. U.S. space agency NASA broadcast the undocking procedure live over the Internet - but nothing happened, despite the ATV3's highly sophisticated electronics.

 

This payload vehicle, built under the direction of Astrium, the space division of European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company [EADS], can even dock automatically. This time, however, the capsule was unable to manage the much simpler of undocking.

 

Posted by Worldmeets.US

There were immediate recriminations on expert blogs. Some reports claimed that a Russian laptop on the ISS had issued a radio command for the vehicle to undock, but that the ATV didn't respond. So therefore, [according to the Russians], it was the ATVís fault. But on Wednesday, the European Space Agency explained that the command for undocking was sent to the wrong supply capsule address. Experts unequivocally determined that the signal was sent to ID number 34; however, it was supposed to be sent to 35.

 

Numerous Mishaps in Space

 

As to how such a mishap could have occurred, the ESA has been mum so far. There will be another attempt for undocking in the early hours of Friday, Sept. 28.

 

This mishap of a command sent to the wrong capsule address is just the latest chapter in a book full of misadventures in space. The launch in March of an ATV was thwarted for several weeks. Someone had forgotten to properly harness the payload tanks inside the 10-meter craft. This negligence was discovered only when the top of its rocket was mounted.

 

 

SEE ALSO ON THIS:

Opera Mundi, Brazil: In the Name of Money or National Prestige, Mars will be Colonized
Le Temps, Switzerland: Honor Neil Armstrong: Let Us Begin a Manned Mars Mission 'Now'

NRC Handelsblad, The Netherlands: Travel To Moon and Stars is What Humanity Needs
The Straits Times, Malaysia: Beijing Calls Space Arms Race a 'Historic Inevitability'

El Mundo, Spain: The Iron Grip of the U.S. 'Nuclear-Space Industrial Complex'
Tribune de Geneve, Switzerland: The Moon and the Chinese; Mars and America

Novosti, Russia: With Shuttle Launch, America Risks Its Image - and Its Astronauts

Novosti, Russia: Another Visit to Mars; 'It's the Americans Again'

Nachrichten, Switzerland: Climate Change Solution: Shoot Cheney into Space

Korean Central News, North Korea: The United States Seeks 'Monopoly of Outer Space'

 

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In 1998, a U.S. Mars probe was lost because metric measurements were confused with imperial units. Last year, a Russian Proton rocket was refueled with the wrong quantity of fuel, which meant that the satellite could not reach its planned orbit.

 

The most serious glitch was a rag forgotten in an Ariane 4 rocket fuel line in 1090, which ended with the rocket crashing. Another mishap includes the German TV satellite TV-SAT 1, launched in 1987. It failed because either someone forgot to remove a transport safety brace, or the solar panels were mounted upside down. Experts argue about the case to this day.

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[Posted by Worldmeets.US Sept. 28, 6:25am]

 

 

 

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